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How do you make Plum Gin? | English Plum Gin | National Dish of England

How do you make Plum Gin? National Dish of England
You can use any variety of Plum, I’m using Mirrabella and Victoria
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

The time of year is late August and my two Plum tree varieties – Mirebelle and Victoria are ready to harvest.

I could make Jam but that means eating bread and that ain’t gonna happen. So I’m making Gin!

How do you make Plum Gin? This recipe will have it ready for Christmas.

Print this bad boy out
How do you make Plum Gin? | English Plum Gin | National Dish of England
This isn't really a recipe, it's a process - a little bit of work up front, especially around sterilising your Kilner Jar, give it a shake for a week and then leave it the hell alone for 3 months - simples...
Course Cocktail, Drinks
Cuisine British, English
Keyword Gin, Homemade, Plums
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 0
Passive Time 3 months
Servings
litre
Ingredients
Course Cocktail, Drinks
Cuisine British, English
Keyword Gin, Homemade, Plums
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 0
Passive Time 3 months
Servings
litre
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Sterilise your Kilner Jar, wash your plums and measure out your ingredients.
  2. Get a clean fork and stab your plums all over, this will release all the juices into the Gin. Any plums that look a little ropey throw away, we want to avoid excess nasty bacteria.
  3. Now add all the ingredients to the jar and give it a shake and seal - place in a cool, dry and dark cupboard.
  4. For the next week, shake on a daily basis to dissolve the sugar and then leave alone for at least 3 months. Should be perfect for Christmas. If you want to make more, just double all the ingredients.
    The Plum Gin takes on the plum colour after only a few days
  5. After three months and you were good at sterilising you'll have some kick ass plum gin. Just look how much the colour changes and I promise you, this goes in to the flavour.
    Look at the colour change of Plum Gin after three months
  6. You'll need to filter the sediment out, I used a jar with a tap and ran it through clean muslin into a pan.
    When the Plum Gin is ready you need to strain it to remove the sediment
  7. More sterilising, hopefully you had the sense to keep some old gin bottles, or any bottle, in anticipation of this day - make sure they are ultra clean. Fill em up and cap it off. You might want to sellotape the lids, as if they were bought from a shop - further fermentation could force the them off.
    Rinse out some bottles to keep your plum gin safe
  8. My homemade Plum Gin made great Christmas gifts - not all of it though...
  9. Thank you England United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Recipe Notes
I'm sorry, I know this looks like an old man having a wee - although, he's got issues if it's that colour, tastes good though. But, I filmed it so I might as well post it. If videos of gin filtering into a pan gets you going, sit back, grab some Kleenex and enjoy...


14 thoughts on “How do you make Plum Gin? | English Plum Gin | National Dish of England”

  • Hi – can I get away with leaving out the pinch of cardamom & pinch of juniper – not something I have in my store cupboard. Thank you – Trudi

    • Hi Trudi – yes you can. Juniper forms the very core of a Gin’s flavour, so you’re already loaded. The cardamom pods are a gentle touch to inject a little extra seasoning, but gin is laced with herbs and spices. This recipe is so plum heavy, your gin won’t suffer in the slightest without either. Have fun. W

  • Hi Wayne we have made plum gin and greengage gin, I am a little concerned that the plums are looking as if they are going off where they are exposed to the air at the top of the Kilmer jar .is this normal ?
    Thanks for sharing

    • Hi Louise – this could be possible if the sterilisation process didn’t go well or the fruit itself wasn’t in good shape. If you made the jam from the same batch, that might also start to go off. If it was the sterilisation process, the jam jar may be affected in the same way. I would say, floating plums doesn’t sound ideal. For me, the gin deepens in colour so much that you can barely make out the plums. However, when it comes to tasting it for the first time, there is always some trepidation that bacteria have had the run of things and everything has gone off. Might as well stick with it for the three months – either way, nothing you can do now. Always time to get a new batch in for Christmas if you’re concerned. Good luck.

  • Can you make this in a plastic container rather than glass. Or will the plastic affect the process or the taste. Thanks

  • Thanks for the recipe, I’m thinking about trying to make plum gin as we have a heap this year. I was just going to use Standard Gordon’s gin but would be great to hear any other suggestions.
    Cheers

    • Hello Pete, yah, good question. Plum Gin can be very sweet, especially this recipe – we drink it neat, but also use dry mixers to tone it down. Tonic works well or Soda Water. I did try to dilute a batch once, with more Gin – it wasn’t ideal.

      I did use less sugar in other Gin infusions, they didn’t turn out as well as the plum Gin – it’s almost liqueur like, but more boozy.

      The only thing that really works to make a less sweeter drink, are good mixers.

    • Hello Shane, I’m rather curious myself. They’re two very contrasting options. With the plum the added sugar plays a huge part – we drink it neat, it’s so lovely. Sloe berries are more tart and dry and also needs sugar. I’d lump for 50/50 – you guys have got to tell me how it goes. It could be great or not work, at all. I can tell you, plum gin is different to slow gin, for sure.

    • Hey Pamela, I think that sounds like a great idea. Sweet and dry in one Gin – stop it! I’ve never tried it – I think experimenting with Gin flavours is a big part of the fun. Let me know how it goes…in three months! @NationalDish

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